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Workers Have Rights.
We Know How To Protect Them.

Keeping the EEOC focused on protecting at-risk workers

| Sep 11, 2019 | Workplace Discrimination |

Pursuing a career in Washington, DC, brings with it many unique challenges and opportunities. One hurdle that people should not have to face is the fear of being discriminated against in the workplace. Their place of employment should allow them the safety and support to perform their responsibilities with confidence and effectiveness. Unfortunately, there are plenty of situations where people do not feel safe at work because of the way they are treated. 

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission maintains the responsibility of enforcing laws that have been designed to expose, address and eliminate discrimination of any kind within the workplace. With adequate response to claims where employees have alleged, they were discriminated against, the EEOC can encourage businesses to implement practices that will help them create a culture of acceptance and tolerance. In turn, companies can see an increase in productivity and a unified drive to accomplish organizational objectives by all employees. 

However, a recent study conducted by Paychex, a company offering maintenance of human resource services, has some wondering whether or not the EEOC is protecting the wrong group of people. While designed to monitor the proper implementation of related laws to protect at-risk workers, some experts are wondering if the EEOC is actually doing a better job of protecting employers who have been accused of discrimination. In a group of cases that were analyzed, it was found that over a 21-year period and out of 1.9 million cases, the EEOC did not take any action on a startling 87 percent of them. 

If people have been the victims of workplace discrimination and have evidence that their career and ability to use their skills is being sorely affected, they may wish to contact an attorney. Legal professionals have the means to organize evidence to show that discrimination is the culprit for victims’ suffering. 

Source: Forbes, “Is The EEOC Protecting Workers or Discriminatory Employers?,” Patricia Barnes, Sep. 4, 2019