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Invisible disabilities may need accommodations at work

| Apr 23, 2020 | Workplace Discrimination |

Disabilities come in many forms and affect each person differently. In some cases, a disability is immediately apparent due to a person using a wheelchair, having physical signs of a condition or other visual factors that allow others to clue in to the person’s condition. However, some people live with invisible disabilities, or those that do not have outward, visible signs. In some cases, these people may not be taken as seriously when they request accommodations at work for their conditions.

Many Washington, D.C., workers may live with invisible disabilities. While they may appreciate that their conditions do not have outward signs because it affords them a modicum of privacy regarding the matter, it can be difficult to prove that the condition can cause problems at work. For example, someone who experiences migraines, insomnia, ADHD, dyslexia or other conditions may outwardly appear fine, but they may really need some assistance to ensure that they can work to the best of their ability.

In some cases, individuals with invisible disabilities may need to take more breaks than workers who do not have such conditions. They may need a more flexible work schedule or extra time off work. Because such flexibility is often not automatically come by in many jobs, a request may be necessary.

Requesting accommodations at work can certainly seem stressful. After all, a person may fear exposing his or her invisible disability due to concerns about being treated differently. It is also possible for Washington, D.C., workers to worry that their employers will deny their requests because their disability is not visible. In the event that an employer unjustly denies such a request, affected workers may want to learn about their legal options for rectifying the situation.