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Discrimination can fall into various categories

On Behalf of | Jul 12, 2021 | Workplace Discrimination |

Working in a positive environment can make going into the office or other work setting much more enjoyable. When Washington, D.C. area employees know that they are valued and that they will not face mistreatment, they are more likely to take pride in their work. Unfortunately, discrimination can quickly make an otherwise capable worker feel inadequate, frustrated and uninterested in the work, as well as take a negative toll on their overall well-being.

Although laws work to protect workers from being discriminated against on the job, typically, employees have to take the initiative by bringing acts of discrimination to the attention of management or government agencies before an employer or other applicable party can be held accountable. Of course, it is not always clear cut as to what may constitute discrimination.

Unlawful treatment of a worker based on a protected characteristic could land in various categories, including:

  • Race discrimination, which could include not hiring or promoting an employee, unjustly firing an employee, or subjecting an employee to hostile actions in the workplace due to his or her race
  • Gender discrimination, which could include excluding employees from leadership positions, paying employees unfairly, and criticizing employees for what they wear or how they act, due to their gender
  • Disability discrimination, which could include not providing reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act, incorrectly assuming a person cannot do a job because of a disability, and treating employees in a hostile manner due to their disability

These examples are only a few of the many ways in which workers in the Washington, D.C. area could face discrimination on the job. If these or other discriminatory issues arise, it may be necessary to bring the problem to the attention of those in authority. In some cases, that may mean a manager or supervisor, and in other cases, issues may need to be addressed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, or the state and local anti-discrimination agencies.