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Sexual harassment leads to class action suit against McDonald’s

| Jun 1, 2020 | Sexual Harassment |

People can be made to feel uncomfortable in a variety of ways and in a variety of settings. However, when someone is facing sexual harassment in the workplace, the situation can go beyond simply feeling uncomfortable. Victims of such actions can experience feelings of anxiety, depression and other mental health issues as well as feel fearful about going to work. When management does not handle complaints effectively, workers may wonder what to do.

Readers in Washington, D.C. may be interested in a class action lawsuit that was recently filed against McDonald’s due to claims of systemic sexual harassment. The class includes approximately 5,000 women at 100 locations, with two lead plaintiffs who were co-workers at one location. The lead plaintiffs stated that they faced physical assaults and verbal abuse on the job, including groping and comments about their bodies. These actions came from both co-workers and customers.

One of the plaintiffs stated that she complained about the actions, but rather than issuing disciplinary action to the assailants, the woman stated that her hours were cut before she was eventually fired. The other plaintiff indicated that her hours were also cut after making multiple complaints about harassment. The lawsuit hopes to achieve $500 million in damages and new anti-harassment policies for McDonald’s.

Though sexual harassment has no place anywhere, it can be immensely difficult for workers to know how to handle such actions in the workplace. When managers or other superiors do not handle the situation appropriately, it may be time to take legal action. Workers in Washington, D.C. who have faced this type of ordeal may wish to gain information on their rights and available options for seeking justice.