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Having conversations about reasonable accommodations

| Dec 28, 2020 | Workplace Discrimination |

Discussing a personal matter with an employer is not always easy. However, many workers in Washington, D.C. may need to request reasonable accommodations in the workplace in order to perform their duties to the best of their abilities. Often, open communication can better ensure that a worker’s needs are met and that an employer is complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

This type of conversation can be difficult for all parties involved. The worker requesting an accommodation may feel uneasy about having to expose personal information about his or her health to an employer, and the employer may feel uncomfortable requesting documentation and more information about a disability or health condition. Still, it is important that an employer understands the limitations that a worker has and how an accommodation may be able to help.

Of course, there is a fine line to tread during such conversations. An employer should not request unnecessary information or violate a worker’s privacy in order to obtain information. If the employer feels that more documentation is needed, it is likely that another conversation will need to occur. Remaining open and remembering that this is a process may help it go much more smoothly.

Unfortunately, some Washington, D.C. workers may find that their employers are not receptive to conversation about the need for reasonable accommodations or are denied an accommodation without cause. When this happens, it can be immensely disheartening for any worker. If this type of scenario does take place, workers may want to remember that employers have an obligation to comply with the ADA and that any violations could warrant legal action.